Diagonals

Diagonals

For this exercise my objective was to take four photographs using strong, bold diagonal lines within the composition. There are a few ways in which you could do this; I used perspective, viewpoint and diagonal structures to complete my task. This exercise demonstrates to us the effects that using diagonal lines has on an image; like vertical lines interpret something different to horizontal lines, as do diagonal lines.

I have taken four black-and-white images for this exercise, trying not to repeat any of the ways in which the diagonal lines appear in an image.

Diagonal 1 

Diagonal 1

This is a tightly framed image of a door constructed of diagonal wooden slats that create a series of diagonal lines emanating from one central vertical line. The lines stem in a downward fashion give a sense of upward movement, this is achieved by the equidistance and consistency of the lines. Other than the one vertical line in the centre, there are only diagonal lines in the image. A very simple image that conveys movement and direction very well.

Diagonal 2

Diagonal 2

Perspective is what has achieved the diagonal lines in this image. Had these lines been photographed from a different angle, they may not have been diagonal at all; after all, they are technically not diagonal. There are four predominant lines in this image but there are also many more subtle ones continuing with the diagonal theme, each with a slightly different angle. The diagonal lines in this image strongly suggest depth and distance.

Diagonal 3

Diagonal 3

This is an image of the underside of a spiral road from a roof car park. Every line in this photograph is diagonal, each with a slightly different angle. The viewpoint has given a sense of depth and movement.

Diagonal 4

Diagonal 4

These wall supports provide an abundance of diagonal lines, the viewpoint adds depth and distance as the proximity of the lines compress.

Conclusion

In conjunction with reading Michael Freeman’s (2007) ‘The Photographer’s Eye’, this exercise has taught me that diagonal lines are more in the control of the photographer when using perspective. Diagonal lines suggest a much stronger sense of motion and direction than vertical lines and also add a lot more depth. I think that either vertical, horizontal or diagonal lines could be incorporated in most imagery depending on what the photographer wishes to convey and should be strongly considered before shooting.

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