Multiple points


Multiple points

The objective of this exercise is to demonstrate the importance of implied lines and connectivity between multiple points in order to strengthen composition and induce a correct flow of the eye.

The exercise requested six photographs with a simple but attractive background to arrange the points on. I chose a background of large, jagged rocks and used six small apples as the points. I have taken six photographs labelled ‘Image 1’ to ‘Image 6’ corresponding to the amount of points in the relative image. Again, I have shot this exercise in black-and-white to keep to the fundamentals of the objective. I produced the work for this exercise in my studio with a flash head kit and set my Nikon D300 on a tripod

Image 1

 Image 1

I have positioned the first point in such a way that it sits within the largest shape in the frame; this is a natural place to position the first point as this is the largest area of empty space.

Image 2

 Image 2

The next natural step was to place the next apple in the second largest shape which is in the bottom right of the frame; I repositioned it because I felt it was too balanced, almost symmetrical. I believe that this position creates a better composition.

Image 3

 Image 3

I placed the third point next to the first point and felt that this favoured the composition but only with the repositioning of the second point. Again, the natural place to put the third point was on the rock in the bottom right; I didn’t like the points placed equidistantly from each other since it lacked relation. The apple on the right has been placed too close to the edge.

Image 4

 Image 4

I moved the apple on the right away from the edge of the frame and placed the fourth point in the atrium created by the natural lead-in lines but feel that it has almost become part of the background because of this; it has become lost.

Image 5

 Image 5

The fifth point has been placed on the line between the rocks in an effort to lift the fourth point. Placing this point here has helped to relate all of the other points and has started to create implied shapes.

Image 6

 Image 6

With the sixth and final point introduced to the set, I felt it was necessary to move the first and third point in order to achieve a good composition.

Image 7

 Image 7

This is the final image that demonstrates the shapes and lead-in lines that are subtly constructed by the positioning of the points. The internal shapes are comprised solely of triangles and most of the lead-in lines either lead to the centre or to another lead-in line; as a result, this leads the eye to the centre of the image.

Conclusion

In this exercise, I have learned that you can create energy and movement depending on where several points in a photograph are positioned; it is very important to create this sort of energy in a photograph to avoid a static and ‘flat’ image. I have also learned how important the dynamics of ‘lead-in’ lines are to imply shapes, give the image movement and keep the viewer interested.

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